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Patentsuche

  1. Erweiterte Patentsuche
VeröffentlichungsnummerUS1147614 A
PublikationstypErteilung
Veröffentlichungsdatum20. Juli 1915
Eingetragen7. Okt. 1914
Prioritätsdatum7. Okt. 1914
VeröffentlichungsnummerUS 1147614 A, US 1147614A, US-A-1147614, US1147614 A, US1147614A
ErfinderCharles A Dearborn
Ursprünglich BevollmächtigterCharles A Dearborn
Zitat exportierenBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Externe Links: USPTO, USPTO-Zuordnung, Espacenet
Sewing-machine.
US 1147614 A
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c. A. DEARBORN .SEWING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILLED OCT. 7. I914.

Patented July 20, 1915.

4 SHEETS SHEET I.

9 z a umw coLuMulA PLANDGRAPH (0.. WASHINGTON. D. it

c. A. DEARBO RN.

SEWING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED OCT. 7, 1914.

1,147,61 4. 1 Patented July 20, 1915.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.'

I N N 8 X 5 g I I I k I I A", W

I M 6mm 9% COLUMBIA PLANOGRAPH co., WASHINGTON, D. c.

C. A. DEARBORN.

SEWING MACHINE.

APPLICATION HLED ear. 1. 1914.

1, 147,614. Patented July 20, 1915.

4 SHEETS SHEET 4.

"Z a a Gavan/{43oz COLUMBIA PLANOORAXH 110.. WASHINGTON, D. c.

35 MWZEM UNITED srA'rEs PA NT CHARLES A. 'DnAniaonmoEN-Ew YORK, NQY.

SEWING-MACHINE.

Specification of Letters l atent.

oFF oE.

Patented July 20, 1915.

Application filed October 7, 1914. Serial N 0. 865,514.

known as turned seams, such as are formed upon the finished edges of coats and other garments. r 1 l The invention in 'its simplest form. comprises a sewing machine having stitch-fo-rming and work feeding mechanism in combination with oppositely acting devices operating respectively on the seam and the layers of material adjacent thereto to stretch or spread the turned material backwardly upon the seam, the arrangement being such that the basting thread is sewed through the work while it is held in position by said oppositely acting devices.

In one embodiment of my invention I em- 1 ploy the ordinary work feeding foot and cooperating presser foot to engage the exposed surfaces of the two turned over layers of the work which is preliminarily manipulated by the hands of the operator, while the stretcting or spreading device which acts upon the seam in opposition to the said feeding device is in the form of an oscillating hook acting preferably in the plane of the feed of the work, transversely to the line of feed, to engage the work in or near the line of the seam to pull the seam slightly in one direction while the body of the work is held as explained.

p In another form ofmy invention I have introduced an additional element in the form of cloth spreading or stretching members which engage the turned over layers of the work at a point between the stitchforming and feeding mechanisms and the spreading or stretching hook, said spreading or stretching members acting directly 0pposite to the hook so that 'while the hook is pulling the seam ,in" one direction, said spreading'or stretching members are moving the turned over layers of the work in the opposite direction. In this form of machine the described operation takes place just prior to each penetration of the 'work' by the needle.

In order that my invention may be fully understood, I will first describe the same with reference to the accompanying draw' ings, and after-wards point out the novelty more particularly in the annexed claims.

In said drawings,-Figure 1 is a front elevation of one form of my improved sewingmachinea Fig. 2 is asectional plan View of the same. Fig. 3 is a detail sectional endviewo f part of the same. F ig. 4 is a detail View slmilar to Fig. 2, illustrating the operation of the machine upon a piece of Work.

Figs. 5 and 6 arerespectively adetail plan and elevation of one form of stretching or spreading hook. Fig; 7 is a view similar to Fig.- 2 ofasimplified form of machine embodying my invention. Fig. 8 is a detail front elevation of the spreading'or stretching hook and its operation mechanism. Figs. 9, 10 and 11 are detail views of a slightly modified form of the 'st're'tchinghor spreading hook.

The machine is built upon ing u'p'from the base; J ournaled in the arm 2 and in the usual bearing standards. upon any suitable frame, such as shown in which 1 1s abase and 2 the usual sewlng machine arm, standthe base 1, is the main shaft which extends horizontally and longitudinally through the machine and is provided at one end with the fly wheel 6 and the driving pulley 7. "Atthe opposite end of the shaft 5 is mounted a rotary hook (not shown) of the ordinary stitch-formingmechanism or if preferred, theordinary rotary shuttle of well known form may: be suitably mounted upon the shaft 5.

10 is a common form of needle bar carry-J ing the usual needle 11, operating in bearusual rocker lever 13, 'journaled upon the arm 2 at'l l, and driven by the eccentric link mechanism actuated by the eccentric 16 upon i 'the shaft '5. t

' the bearing standards of the machineframe.

25 is the usual feed dogoperating, in the slots of the cloth supportingplate 20 and rigidly mounted at 26 upon the horizontal ings 12 of the arm .2, and actuated by the f rocker arm 27, which is journaled upon bearingpin 28 carried in the upper end of the vertical rocker arm 29, which carries at its lower end the bearing pin 30 suitably journaled in the base frame of the machine.

.- The forward and back movements of rocker operating upon the eccentric 35 and pivoted at its opposite end upon the journal pin 28. Up and down movements of rocker arm 27 are effected by the cam 40 on shaft 5 and the arm 11 projecting from rocker arm 27 and resting upon the cam 40.

41-5 is the usual spring actuated presser foot mounted upon the vertical rod 46, which has bearings in the sewing machine frame and is actuated and controlled to cooperate with the work supporting plate and feed dog in the usual manner.

The stitch-forming and feeding mechanisms above described are of the: common construction in sewing machines in general use today. Their specific form is not es sential to the present invention but they are described only as illustrating the principles of the necessary elements of the improved machine, the novelty in which comprises the combination with suitable work feeding and stitch-forming mechanisms of devices for spreading or stretching the outer layers of work away from the seam in forming a 4 turned seam.

At the front of the machine, adjacent to the vertical. transverse plane of the stitchforming and feeding mechanisms is a bear"- ing standard 50, upon the upper end of which is journaled a rock arm 51 to which is adjustablv and removably secured a cloth engaging hook member 52. This hook member 52 may be formed with an integral pointed claw 53 as shown in Figs. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the drawings, or the hook member may be formed with a removable claw as shown in Figs. 7-11 of the drawings as hereinafter described. This hook member 52 is secured to the horizontal rock arm 51 either by means of a single set screw 54 as shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 4c of the drawings or by means of two set screws 55 as shown in Figs. 5 and 6 of the drawings. In either form it is to be understood that the hook member 52 can be securely clamped upon the rock arm 51 in the exact horizontal plane desired to perform its work, or, if preferred, the set screws 54 or 55 can be left loose so that the hook member 52 will have a relative motion upon its supporting rock arm 51 to enable it to automatically adjust itself to the crotch of the seam in performing its work.

The hook carrying rock arm 51 is pivoted at 60 to a pit-man 61 which is pivoted at its opposite end 62 to a rock arm 63 journaled at 64: upon a standard 65 and connected through a ournal sleeve with a rock arm 66, which has a ball and socket bearing 67 with the forward end of pitman 68 connected at its rear end through ball and socket bearing 69, with an upwardly projecting arm or lug 70, formed integral with the rear end of the eccentric link 36. By this arrangement of parts hook member 52 is oscillated or rocked in a horizontal plane in timed relation to the forward and backward movements of the feed dog.

Projecting up from the base 1 between the standards 50 and 65 of the machine frame is a bearing standard upon the upper end of which is pivoted a short rock arm 76. A set screw 7 7 passes through said rock arm 7 6 into the standard 7 5 to form the pivotal bearing therefor. Pivoted at 7 8 upon the short rock arm 7 6 is a horizontal arm or lever 79. Secured to the working end of said lever 79 by means of a set screw 80 is a work engaging jaw 81 havinga downwardly curved lip 82 and a serrated or roughened cloth engaging face 83. This jaw 81 is presented directly beneath the plane of feed of the work and is, by reason of its mounting, designed to move slightly in the direction of feed and transversely thereto as will be more plainly pointed out hereinafter.

The lever 79 is formed with integral ears or lugs 85 carrying bearing screws 86, upon which are pivoted the ears or lugs 87, formed integral with a member 88 formed at its working end with a jaw 89 having upturned lip 90 and serrated working face 91, and presented in working relation to the lower jaw 81 of the lever 79. A pin passes through the heel of member 88 into the lever 7 9 and extension spring 96 is mounted upon said pin 95 and acts upon the heel of member 88 to tend to move the upper jaw 89 toward the lower jaw 81. The right hand extension or tail 79 of lever 79 is pivotally connected with the rock arm 63 at 62.

Journaled in the upper end of the standard 100 is a short rock shaft 101 formed with a wing 102 which is presented just beneath the member 88 as shown particularly in Fig. 1 of the drawings. This rock shaft 101 has a downwardly and forwarding projecting extension 101 which rests above a cam 103 upon the main shaft 5, so that under the action of said cam the wing 102 engages member 88 periodically for raising and lowering jaw 89 with relation to the jaw 81. V

The operation of this form of the machine will be clear with particular reference to Fig. 1, with but slight additional explanation. The work is placed in the machine in the usual manner between the work support ing plate 20 and presser foot 1-5, care being taken to insert the seam edge toward the right between the jaws S1 and 89. As the machine is started the feed in the usual way moves the work forward the length of a stitch, the needle being out of the work. While this feeding movement is taking place, the cloth engaging jaws 81 and 89 held in engagement with the opposite turned over layers of the work adjacent to the seam,

are caused to move laterally to the left and at the same time forwardly with the feed, for smoothing out and stretching slightly the layers of the work in the plane of feed. Simultaneously with the actionof the feed and cloth-engaging jaws the hook 53 of member 52 engages the work in the crotch of the turned seam and moves toward the right, tending to pull the seam line to the right, while the turned over layers of the work are stretched or smoothed in the opposite direction. The movement of the hook member 52 does not interfere with the feed of the work, since its claw 53, when in engagement with the crotch of the seam, moves forwardly in the direction of feed at the same time thatit is pulling transversely tothe right. At the completion of this feed ing, smoothing and stretching operation, the needle penetrates the work in the usual manner and secures the goods in the described adjusted position. I have found in some classes of work that it is desirable to have the hook member 52 loosely mounted upon its carrier so as to enable it to automatically adjust itself vertically, while it is operated, and particularly during its rearward or neg ative stroke, since the loose mounting will enable the rearward movement of the hook to readily adjust itself into the extreme crotch of the turned seam, so as to more effectively pull the seam line transversely during the next succeeding active stroke of the hook.

The hook member 52 and the work engaging jaws 81 and 89 are operated from the same eccentric 35 that actuates the feed, so that the proper cooperation of these parts is insured in a simple manner. The timing of the cam 103 is such that when the lever member 79 is moving toward the right on its negative stroke, the jaw 89 will be held away from the jaw 81 to free the work between said jaws.

Referring now to the simplified form of machine illustrated in Figs. 7-11 of the drawings, it should be understood that the work feeding and stitch-forming mechanisms are the same as in the form of the machine ust described. The work engaging and stretching jaws of the first form of machine are entirely omitted in the simplified form about to be described, since I have discovered by experiment upon certain classes of work that the operator can so manipulate the upper and lower layers of work with relation to the turned seam when it is held by the feed mechanism and presser foot, as to enable the work engaging hook to effectively stretch the seam line inwardly from the line of stitches to produce satisfactory results. The work engaging hook member operates on the same principle and diflers only in details of construction. In this simplified form of machine the hook carrier is in the form of a sleeve 110 journaled upon the standard 50 and having secured to its upper reduced end a split collar 111 held in position thereon by a screw 112. Mounted upon this collar 111 is a semi-circular plate 113, secured to the collar by set screws 11 1, by which the curved plate 113 can be rigidly secured in the desired position, or can be loosely mounted upon the carrier collar 111 for the same purpose as above described with reference to the form of hook shown in Figs. 5 and 6. The plate 113 carries a removable pointed claw 115 made of bent steel wire with loop 116 which rests in the recess 117 of plate 113 and is clamped therein by a set screw 118. This construction is desirable from a practical standpoint, since the claw 115 can readily be replaced if it should become broken or dulled. In the operation of this simplified form of machine, the hook member acts eX- actly as described with reference to the preferred form, the feed member and presser foot and the hand of the operatorholding the the turned over layers of the worksufii-v ciently to enable the hook to line slightly to the right.

So far as I am aware, the operation .of basting turned seams, preparatory to the finishing stitching, has heretofore always been done by hand. The improved machine pull the seam will effectively and uniformly baste suchY turned seams, so that this operation will be cheapened and the result improved by the use of my machine.

I claim 1. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination of oppositely acting devices engaging and. operating respectivelyuponthe seam and the material adjacent thereto to force the line of the seam toward the edge of the work and" spread the material away from the line of seam and stitch-forming mechanism for subsequently sewing said turned seam;

2. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of oppositely acting devices operating respectively upon the scam I and the upper and lower layers of material adjacent thereto to force the line of the seam toward the edge of the work and spread the layers of material away from the line of seam.

3. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch-forming mechanism, of means adapted to engage and hold the work at or adjacent to the seam, and a pair of cooperating work spreading jaws'arranged to engage the upper and lower surfaces of material and spread the same away from the line of the seam.

4:. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable Work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a cloth engaging hook adapted to engage the material adjacent to the stitching line of the seam and pull the seam line laterally toward the edge of the work.

5. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable Work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of an oscillating cloth engaging hook, operating in the plane of feed at one side of the path of the work and adapted to engage the material adjacent to the stitching line of the seam and pull the seam line toward the edge of the work.

6. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a pair of cooperating work spreading jaws arranged to en gage the upper and lower surfaces of mate rial adjacent to the seam, and a hook member arranged to engage the work at or adjacent to the seam. and pull the line of the seam oppositely from said jaws.

In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a pair of cooperating work spreading jaws operating parallel with the plane of feed and arranged to engage the upper and lower surfaces of material adjacent to the seam, a hook member operating in the plane of feed at one side of the path of the work and arranged to engage the work at or adjacent to the seam and pull the line of the seam oppositely from said jaws, and operating means arranged to cause said aws and hook member to move forwardly in the direction of the feed and transversely thereof in opposite directions.

8. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a pair of cooperating work spreading jaws operating parallel with the plane of feed and arranged to engage the upper and lower surfaces of material adjacent to the seam, means for mov ing said jaws to and fro transversely of the line of feed and in the direction of feed, means for opening and closing said jaws with relation to the work, a hook member operating in the plane of feed at one side of the path of the work and arranged to engage the work at or adjacent to the seam and pull the line of the seam oppositely from said jaws, and means for moving said hook member to and fro into and out of engagement with the work.

9. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a work engaging hook operating in the plane of feed adapted to automatically adjust itself into the crotch of the turned seam for engaging the material and pulling the seam laterally toward the edge of the work.

10. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a work engaging hook operating in the plane of feed and comprising a rocking carrier member, and a hook member mounted upon the carrier member with a limited up and down movement thereon, said hook member being adapted to automatically adjust itself into the crotch of the turned seam for engaging the material. and pulling the seam laterally toward the edge of the work.

11. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a pair of work-engaging jaws mounted to operate in a horizontal plane above and below the work and move in the direction of and laterally to the line of feed; a work engaging hook operating in the horizontal plane of feed at one side of the path of the work and adapted to engage the work adjacent to the turned seam and pull the seam toward the edge of the work, and a common operating mechanism for said jaws and said hook.

12. In a sewing machine for stitching turned seams, the combination with suitable work feeding mechanism, and suitable stitch forming mechanism, of a pair of work-engaging jaws mounted to operate in a hori- Zontal plane above and below the work and move in the direction of and laterally to the line of feed, a work engaging hook operating in the horizontal plane of feed adapted to engage the work adjacent to the turned seam and pull the seam toward the edge of the work, and means operated by the feeding mechanism for operating said jaws and said hook in unison with the feeding mechamsm.

CHARLES A. DEARBORN.

lVitnesses IVM. E. KNIGHT, LoUnLLA F. LITTLE.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of iatcnts, Washington, D. G.

Referenziert von
Zitiert von PatentEingetragen Veröffentlichungsdatum Antragsteller Titel
US3004503 *4. Aug. 195817. Okt. 1961Henry ErlichmanSecondary independent feed actuator for sewing machines
US3026832 *10. Nov. 195827. März 1962Aichi Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaZigzag embroidering machines
Klassifizierungen
US-Klassifikation112/2, 112/311
UnternehmensklassifikationD05B29/06