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  1. Erweiterte Patentsuche
VeröffentlichungsnummerUS20160113375 A1
PublikationstypAnmeldung
AnmeldenummerUS 14/522,860
Veröffentlichungsdatum28. Apr. 2016
Eingetragen24. Okt. 2014
Prioritätsdatum24. Okt. 2014
Veröffentlichungsnummer14522860, 522860, US 2016/0113375 A1, US 2016/113375 A1, US 20160113375 A1, US 20160113375A1, US 2016113375 A1, US 2016113375A1, US-A1-20160113375, US-A1-2016113375, US2016/0113375A1, US2016/113375A1, US20160113375 A1, US20160113375A1, US2016113375 A1, US2016113375A1
ErfinderCindy Sean Yuei Lim
Ursprünglich BevollmächtigterHCT Group Holdings Limited
Zitat exportierenBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Externe Links: USPTO, USPTO-Zuordnung, Espacenet
Telescopic Cosmetic Apparatus
US 20160113375 A1
Zusammenfassung
A cosmetic apparatus includes a telescopic handle for extending and retracting an applicator head. The cosmetic apparatus may include an applicator head associated with a handle comprising a plurality of stems coaxially arranged and movable along a longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus via a telescopic mechanism. The applicator head may be extended by partially removing a first stem of the plurality of stems from a longitudinal cavity of a second stem of the plurality of stems. The applicator head may be retracted by inserting the first stem at least partially into the longitudinal cavity of the second stem. The cosmetic apparatus configured for telescopically extending and retracting an applicator head may streamline application of cosmetic product and/or storage of cosmetic apparatuses.
Bilder(7)
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Ansprüche(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A cosmetic applicator comprising:
a ferrule;
an applicator head coupled to a first end of the ferrule;
a first stem coupled to a second end of the ferrule, the second end of the ferrule opposite the first end of the ferrule;
a second stem movably coupled to the first stem, the first stem fitting inside a longitudinal cavity of the second stem; and
a third stem movably coupled to the second stem, the second stem fitting inside a longitudinal cavity of the third stem.
2. The cosmetic applicator of claim 1, wherein in a retracted position:
a first end of the first stem is coupled to the second end of the ferrule;
the first end of the first stem, a first end of the second stem, and a first end of the third stem are substantially aligned; and
a second end of the first stem opposite the first end of the first stem, a second end of the second stem opposite the first end of the second stem, a second end of the third stem opposite the first end of the third stem are substantially aligned.
3. The cosmetic applicator of claim 2, wherein in an extended position:
the second end of the first stem is movably coupled to the first end of the second stem; and
the second end of the second stem is movably coupled to the first end of the third stem.
4. The cosmetic applicator of claim 3, wherein the cosmetic applicator moves from the retracted position to the extended position by manually extending the applicator head, the first stem, and/or the second stem by pulling on the applicator head, the first end of the first stem, or the first end of the second stem or automatically extending the applicator head, the first stem, and/or the second stem by actuating an actuator.
5. The cosmetic applicator of claim 3, wherein the second end of the third stem is coupled to another applicator head.
6. The cosmetic applicator of claim 1, further comprising a first limiting mechanism disposed on at least one of the first stem or the second stem to limit a distance that the first stem is insertable into the longitudinal cavity of the second stem, and a second limiting mechanism disposed on at least one of the second stem or the third stem to limit a distance that the second stem is insertable into the longitudinal cavity of the third stem.
7. The cosmetic applicator of claim 1, further comprising a first coupling mechanisms disposed on at least one of the first stem or the second stem to limit a distance that the first stem is extendable from the second stem and a second coupling mechanism disposed on at least one of the second stem or the third stem to limit a distance that the second stem is extendable from the third stem.
8. The cosmetic applicator of claim 1, further comprising one or more locking mechanisms disposed in the handle to lock the handle in a retracted position or an extended position.
9. A cosmetic apparatus comprising:
an applicator head; and
a handle coupled to the applicator head, the handle comprising a plurality of stems coaxially arranged and movable along a longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus via a telescopic mechanism.
10. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 9, wherein the applicator head comprises a sponge applicator head, a foam applicator head, a flocked applicator head, a silicon applicator head or a brush applicator head.
11. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 9, wherein the applicator head comprises a brush applicator head and the handle is coupled to the applicator head by a ferrule.
12. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 9, wherein:
the handle comprises an ovular cross sectional shape, a circular cross sectional shape, a rectangular cross sectional shape, or a triangular cross sectional shape; and
each of the plurality of stems comprises a same cross sectional shape as the handle.
13. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 9, wherein:
the plurality of stems arranged coaxially are slidable between a retracted position and an extended position;
the plurality of stems are substantially coextensive in the retracted position; and
the plurality of stems are positioned in series in the extended position.
14. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 13, wherein the plurality of stems arranged coaxially are slidable by manually extending individual stems of the plurality of stems by pulling on ends of the individual stems or by automatically extending the individual stems by actuating an actuator.
15. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 14, wherein the actuator comprises at least one of a push button, a knob, or twisting elements coupled to the individual stems.
16. The cosmetic apparatus of claim 9, wherein:
the plurality of stems include at least a first stem and a second stem;
the second stem has a cross sectional area larger than the first stem and has a longitudinal cavity that is at least as large as the first stem; and
the longitudinal cavity is sized to receive at least part of the first stem.
17. A cosmetic implement comprising:
a telescopic handle having a first end and a second end, the second end opposite the first end;
a first applicator head disposed on the first end of the handle; and
a second applicator head disposed on the second end of the handle.
18. The cosmetic implement of claim 17, wherein the telescopic handle comprises a plurality of concentric stems that are movable along a longitudinal axis of the cosmetic implement.
19. The cosmetic implement of claim 18, wherein the plurality of concentric stems are movable by manually extending individual stems of the plurality of concentric stems by pulling on ends of the individual stems or automatically extending the individual stems by actuating an actuator.
20. The cosmetic implement of claim 18, wherein:
the first applicator is associated with at least some of the plurality of concentric stems that are movable in a first direction along the longitudinal axis; and
the second applicator is associated with at least some of the plurality of concentric stems that are movable in a second direction along the longitudinal axis, the second direction being in an opposite direction from the first direction.
Beschreibung
    BACKGROUND
  • [0001]
    Applicators may be used for removing cosmetic or medicinal products from the devices and applying the cosmetic or medicinal products to portions of the body. For example, in the medical industry, applicators may be used to remove ointments from storage devices and to apply the ointment to portions of the body. In the cosmetics and personal care industries, applicators are used to apply lipstick, lip balm, skin creams, lotions, powders, and other cosmetic products to portions of the body.
  • [0002]
    Existing cosmetic and medicinal applicators and personal care implements have limited utility, in that applicator stems may be too long or too short for practical use. Thus, consumers typically need to buy applicators and implements of various lengths for their medical, cosmetic, and grooming needs. Small applicators and/or implements may be too short for efficiently applying products to others and large applicators and/or implements may be too long for efficiently applying product to oneself. Often times, switching between applicators and implements of various sizes is inconvenient. Additionally, storing large applicators may be a waste of space.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0003]
    The Detailed Description is set forth with reference to the accompanying figures. In the figures, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the figure in which the reference number first appears. The use of the same reference numbers in different figures indicates similar or identical items.
  • [0004]
    FIG. 1A illustrates a front view of an example cosmetic apparatus capable of extension and retraction configured in an extended position.
  • [0005]
    FIG. 1B illustrates a front view of the example cosmetic apparatus of FIG. 1A configured in a retracted position.
  • [0006]
    FIG. 1C illustrates a cross-sectional view of the example cosmetic apparatus of FIGS. 1A and 1B, taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A.
  • [0007]
    FIG. 2A illustrates an isometric view of another example cosmetic apparatus capable of extension and retraction configured in an extended position.
  • [0008]
    FIG. 2B illustrates an isometric view of the example cosmetic apparatus of FIG. 2A configured in a retracted position.
  • [0009]
    FIG. 3A illustrates an isometric view of yet another example cosmetic apparatus capable of extension and retraction configured in an extended position.
  • [0010]
    FIG. 3B illustrates an isometric view of yet another example cosmetic apparatus capable of extension and retraction configured in an extended position.
  • [0011]
    FIG. 4A illustrates a cross-sectional view of an example cosmetic apparatus taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A.
  • [0012]
    FIG. 4B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the example cosmetic apparatus of FIG. 4A taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 5A illustrates a cross-sectional view of an example cosmetic apparatus taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 5B illustrates a cross-sectional view of the example cosmetic apparatus of FIG. 5A taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION Overview
  • [0015]
    This disclosure is directed to techniques for streamlining the application of cosmetic and/or medicinal products and/or storage of cosmetic apparatuses. Existing cosmetic and medicinal applicators and personal care implements have limited utility because applicator stems may be too long or too short for practical use. Some applicators and/or implements may be too short for extracting product from storage devices with deep holding wells. Other applicators and/or implements may be too long for shallow holding wells. Additionally, small applicators and/or implements may be too short for efficiently applying products to others and large applicators and/or implements may be too long for efficiently applying product to oneself. Often times, switching between applicators and implements of various sizes is inconvenient. Additionally, storing large applicators and/or multiple applicators may be a waste of space.
  • [0016]
    The techniques described herein include a cosmetic apparatus that may extend and retract for extracting product from cosmetic storage devices of various shapes and sizes. The cosmetic apparatus includes an applicator head coupled to a handle. In some examples, the applicator may be coupled to the handle by a ferrule. The handle may include a plurality of stems coaxially arranged to move along a longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus via a telescopic mechanism. In at least one example, if a user desires to remove product from a small storage device with a shallow holding compartment, the user may position the cosmetic apparatus in a retracted position so that the user can extract product from the small storage device. This enables the user to extract a precise amount of product from the storage device. Alternatively, if the user desires to remove product from a large storage device with a deep and/or narrow holding compartment, the user may position the cosmetic apparatus in an extended position so that the user can extract product from the large storage device.
  • [0017]
    A user may desire to apply the product to his or her skin or the skin of another person. If the user desires more control over the cosmetic apparatus—for example, if a user is applying a cosmetic or medicinal product to his or herself—the user can retract the cosmetic apparatus for applying the product with maximum control. Alternatively, if the user desires a longer cosmetic apparatus for applying cosmetic or medicinal product—for example, if a user is applying a cosmetic or medicinal product to another person—the user can extend the cosmetic apparatus. The user may extend the cosmetic apparatus to a full extension or a partial extension depending on his or her desires. Accordingly, cosmetic apparatus that can extend and retract via a telescopic mechanism may streamline the application of cosmetic and/or medicinal products.
  • [0018]
    Cosmetic apparatuses that can extend and retract via a telescopic mechanism may streamline storage of cosmetic apparatuses as well. In at least one example, a user may apply cosmetic or medicinal product via the cosmetic apparatus in an extended position. Then, after the user is finished with the cosmetic or medicinal product, the user may move the cosmetic apparatus to the retracted position for storing the cosmetic apparatus. When the user desires to extract cosmetic and/or medicinal product and/or apply cosmetic and/or medicinal product to his or her skin, the user may extend the cosmetic apparatus to the extended position again. The cosmetic apparatus takes up less space in the retracted position and, as a result, may streamline the storage of cosmetic apparatuses.
  • Illustrative Telescopic Cosmetic Apparatus
  • [0019]
    FIG. 1A illustrates a front view of an example cosmetic apparatus 100 capable of extension and retraction in an extended position. As illustrated in FIG. 1A, the cosmetic apparatus 100 includes at least an applicator head 102. The applicator head 102 may be a sponge applicator head, a foam applicator head, a flocked applicator head, a silicon applicator head and/or a brush applicator head. A brush applicator head 102 may include natural (e.g., sable hair, squirrel hair, goat hair, etc.) and/or synthetic (e.g., nylon, taklon, polyester, silicone, etc.) fibers. In some examples, the applicator head 102 may be coupled to a ferrule 104 and the ferrule 104 may be disposed on an end of a handle 106. In other examples, the applicator head 102 may be coupled to the handle 106. The applicator head 102 may be coupled to the ferrule 104 or handle 106 in a variety of ways. In some examples, the applicator head 102 may be adhered (e.g., glue, cement, mucilage, paste, etc.) to the ferrule 104 or handle 106. In other examples, the applicator head 102 may be coupled to the ferrule 104 or handle 106 by stitching, lacing, screwing, melting, chemical bonding, or some combination of the above.
  • [0020]
    The ferrule 104 may be a band of material that connects the applicator head 102 to a handle 106. The ferrule 104 may be made of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, nickel, aluminum, copper, brass, chrome, titanium, etc.), plastic (e.g., acrylic, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, etc.), etc. In some examples, the ferrule 104 may be crimped to secure the ferrule 104 to the handle 106. In other examples, the ferrule 104 may not be crimped. The ferrule 104 may be associated with the handle 106 in a variety of ways. In some examples, the ferrule 104 may be adhered (e.g., glue, cement, mucilage, paste, etc.) to the handle 106. In other examples, the ferrule 104 may be associated with the handle 106 by stitching, lacing, screwing, welding, bolting, riveting, melting, chemical bonding, or some combination of the above.
  • [0021]
    The handle 106 may be made of a plurality of stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N (collectively referred to as “stems 108”), coaxially arranged. The coaxially arranged stems 108 can move along a longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus, such as along traversal line A-A. While only three telescoping stems are illustrated in this example, in other examples any number of telescoping stems may be used. In some examples, the handle 106 may be made of a metal material (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, titanium, alloys thereof, etc.), a plastic material (e.g., acrylic, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene, etc.), a wood material, ceramic material, graphite material, composite material (e.g., fiberglass, carbon fiber, etc.), combinations of the foregoing, etc.
  • [0022]
    The handle 106 may have a variety of cross sectional shapes, sizes, cross sectional areas, and/or lengths. In some examples, the handle 106 may have a cross section having a circular shape, a triangular shape, a rectangular shape, an ovular shape, etc. The shape of the handle 106 may depend on the shape of the plurality of stems 108. In some examples, each of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may all have a same cross sectional shape and the handle 106 may have the same cross sectional shape as the stems 108. In other examples, some of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may have different shapes so long as the stems 108 are capable of nesting, or fitting one within another. Each of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may have different cross sectional areas.
  • [0023]
    Each of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may include a first end and a second end. In the retracted position, the first ends of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be proximate one another and the second ends of the stems may be proximate one another (i.e., the first ends of the stems 108 are substantially coextensive or substantially aligned). That is, the first end of the first stem 108A, a first end of the second stem 108B, and a first end of the third stem 108N may be substantially aligned and the second end of the first stem 108A, the second end of the second stem 108B opposite the first end of the second stem 108B, a second end of the third stem 108N opposite the first end of the third stem 108N may be substantially aligned. The stems 108 may be slidable by manually extending the stems 108 by pulling the first ends of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N and/or the second ends of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N and/or by automatically extending the first ends of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N and/or the second ends of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N by actuating an actuator, as described below. In the extended position, the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be arranged in series (i.e., end-to-end). That is, in the extended position, the second end of the first stem 108A may be movably coupled to the first end of the second stem 108B and the second end of the second stem 108B may be movably coupled to the first end of the third stem 108N.
  • [0024]
    In some examples, the handle 106 can include additional features for streamlining application of cosmetic and/or medicinal products. In some examples, the distal end of the handle 106, the end furthest from the applicator head 104, may have a gripping surface thereon (e.g., rubber grip, textured surface treatment, soft touch paint, etc.).
  • [0025]
    FIG. 1B illustrates a front view of the example cosmetic apparatus 100 of FIG. 1A in a retracted position. As illustrated in FIG. 1B, the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N are capable of fitting one inside of another. Each of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may include a longitudinal cavity and one or more of the stems 108 may nest inside longitudinal cavities of the other stems 108 as described below.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 1C illustrates a cross-sectional view of the example cosmetic apparatus 100 of FIGS. 1A and 1B, taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A. FIG. 1C illustrates longitudinal cavities 110A, 110B, . . . 110N associated with the one or more stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N, respectively. Each of the longitudinal cavities 110A, 110B, . . . 110N may have various cross sectional areas that enable stems having smaller cross sectional areas (e.g., stem 108A) to nest into longitudinal cavities 110A, 110B, . . . 110N of stems having larger cross sectional areas (e.g., stem 108B). For instance, a first stem (e.g., stem 108A) may have a cross sectional area that is smaller than a second stem (e.g., stem 108B) and the second stem (e.g., stem 108B) may have a longitudinal cavity that is large enough to receive the first stem (e.g., stem 108A). The stem (e.g., stem 108A) having the smaller cross sectional area may nest into the longitudinal cavity associated with the neighboring stem (e.g., stem 108B) having the larger cross sectional area. A neighboring stem is a stem that immediately precedes or succeeds another stem. For example, a first stem (e.g., stem 108A) may be a neighboring stem to a second stem (e.g., stem 108B), as described above. The second stem (e.g., stem 108B) may be a neighboring stem to a first stem (e.g., stem 108A) and a third stem (e.g., stem 108N).
  • [0027]
    The applicator head 102 may be coupled to a first end of a first stem 108A. In examples where the applicator head 102 is coupled to a ferrule 104, the applicator head 102 may be coupled to a first end of the ferrule 104. A second end of the ferrule 104 that is opposite the first end of the ferrule 104 may be associated with a first end of a first stem 108A of the plurality of stems 108. The first stem 108A may have a cross sectional area that is smaller than a cross sectional area of the second stem 108B. In an extended position, the second end of the first stem 108A may be movably fitted within a first end of the second stem 108B and a second end of the second stem 108B may be coupled to a first end of a third stem 108N. In at least one example, the second end of the second stem 108B may be movably fitted within the first end of the third stem 108N. In some examples, the second stem 108B may have a cross sectional area that is larger than the cross sectional area of the first stem 108A but smaller than the cross sectional area of the third stem 108N. As a result, in a retracted position, the first stem 108A may nest inside the longitudinal cavity in the second stem 108B and the second stem 108B may nest inside the longitudinal cavity in the third stem 108N, so that the first ends of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be proximate one another and the second ends of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be proximate one another (i.e., the first ends of the stems 108 are substantially aligned). As noted above, the handle 106 may be made of more or less than three stems 108, and each of the coaxially aligned stems 108 may nest such that all of the stems 108 are contained within a single stem having a largest cross sectional area of all of the stems 108. The single stem that has a largest cross sectional area may be called the anchor stem. In FIG. 1A, the third stem 108N may be the anchor stem.
  • [0028]
    When the stems are arranged in the fully nested configuration such that all of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N are at least partially inserted into the longitudinal cavities associated with their respective neighboring stems, the cosmetic apparatus 100 may be in a retracted position, as shown in FIG. 1B. In some examples, a complete length of each of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be contained within the single stem in the retracted position such that the retracted cosmetic apparatus comprises the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N), a ferrule 104, and the applicator head 102 and all of the other stems are completely inserted into the longitudinal cavity of the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N).
  • [0029]
    In other examples, one or more limiting mechanisms 112 coupled to the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be used to limit a distance that an individual stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be insertable into a longitudinal cavity of a neighboring stem. The one or more limiting mechanisms 112 may include internal guides, friction increasing elements (e.g., rubber or silicone bands, rings, pads, or other elements), friction reducing elements (e.g., bearings, Teflon bands, rings, pads, or other elements), tension elements (e.g., elastic bands or springs biasing the segments of the handle toward the retracted position), holding elements (e.g., magnets or detents to hold the segments of the handle in retracted and/or extended positions), compression elements (e.g., springs biasing the segments of the handle toward the extended position), etc. In some examples, the limiting mechanisms 112 associated with each of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be of a same type. In other examples, the limiting mechanisms 112 associated with each of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be of different types.
  • [0030]
    In at least one example, each of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may include internal guides disposed in their corresponding longitudinal cavities. Internal guides may include sleeves associated with each of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N. Internal guides may include sliding mechanisms that may be configured to guide the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N to predetermined positions. In at least one example, the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N in this example) may include an internal guide 114 that may be disposed on the second end of the anchor stem. The internal guide may have a base portion 114A and a top portion 114B. The base portion 114A may have a cross sectional area larger than the top portion 114B and the cross sectional area of the base portion 114A may be smaller than the cross sectional area of the longitudinal cavity in the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N in this example). This enables the second stem 108B to be inserted into the longitudinal cavity in the anchor stem without unintentional interference by the limiting mechanism 112.
  • [0031]
    The second stem 108B may have an internal guide 116 that is disposed inside of its longitudinal cavity. The internal guide 116 associated with the second stem may movably associate and disassociate with the top portion 114A of the internal guide 114 associated with the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N). In at least one example, the internal guide 116 may have an opening with a cross sectional area slightly larger than the cross sectional area of the top portion 114B and smaller than the cross sectional area of the base portion 114A. As a result, when the second stem 108B is inserted into the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N), the top portion 114B may be received by the opening of internal guide 116 until the internal guide 116 reaches the bottom portion 114A having a cross sectional area that is larger than the opening of the internal guide 116. The internal guides 114 and 116 work together to limit how far the second stem 108B can be inserted into the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N).
  • [0032]
    Similarly, the first stem 108A may have an internal guide 118 that may have an opening with a cross sectional area that is slightly larger than the cross sectional area of the internal guide 116. As the first stem 108A is inserted into the second stem 108B, the internal guide 116 can be received by the opening associated with internal guide 118 until the internal guide 116 no longer can be received by the opening associated with internal guide 118. The internal guides 116 and 118 work together to limit how far the first stem 108A can be inserted into the second stem 108B.
  • [0033]
    In some examples, internal guides such as a flange or lip coupled to the longitudinal cavity of a stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N receiving a neighboring stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N can interact with a flange or a lip coupled to the exterior of the stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N that insertable into the receiving stem to limit a distance the first stem (e.g., 108A in this example) can be inserted into the second stem (e.g., 108B in this example). In other examples, friction increasing elements (e.g., rubber or silicone bands, rings, pads, or other elements) can be coupled to individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N for causing an increase in friction between the stems 108 as the stems 108 are being inserted into neighboring stems. In at least one example, the second stem 108B may be inserted into the anchor stem (e.g., 108N) until the friction between the second stem 108B and the anchor stem (e.g., 108N) exceeds a predetermined threshold. Once the friction between the second stem 108B and the anchor stem (e.g., 108N in this example) exceeds a predetermined threshold, the second stem 108B can be prevented from being inserted any further into the longitudinal cavity of the anchor stem. The limiting mechanisms 112 may limit a distance of one or more of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N that may be inserted inside a neighboring stem, and any portion that is not inserted into the neighboring stem may extend from the longitudinal cavity of the anchor stem (e.g., 108N), as shown in FIG. 1B.
  • [0034]
    The plurality of stems 108 may be movably coupled to one another along a longitudinal axis by a variety of attachment means, such as by snap fit, screw threads, twist lock mechanism, magnetic force, interference fit, combinations of any of the foregoing, or the like. Coupling mechanisms may be coupled to individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N of the plurality of stems 108. The coupling mechanisms may couple a first stem 108A to a second stem 108B and the second stem 108B to a third stem 108N, etc. to limit a distance that the first stem 108A and/or second stem 108B is extendable from the second stem 108B and/or the third stem 108N, respectively. Coupling mechanisms may include internal guides, friction increasing elements (e.g., rubber or silicone bands, rings, pads, or other elements), friction reducing elements (e.g., bearings, Teflon bands, rings, pads, or other elements), tension elements (e.g., elastic bands or springs biasing the segments of the handle toward the retracted position), holding elements (e.g., magnets or detents to hold the segments of the handle in retracted and/or extended positions), compression elements (e.g., springs biasing the segments of the handle toward the extended position), etc.
  • [0035]
    The coupling mechanisms may be activated as a result of a user manually pulling the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N end-on-end along the longitudinal axis. To extend the cosmetic apparatus 100, a user may pull the first stem 108A to a predetermined length. In some examples, the user may continue to pull the first stem 108A and effectively pull on the second stem 108B as a result of a coupling mechanism that movably couples the first stem 108A to the second stem 108B. Alternatively, the user may pull on the first stem 108A until it reaches a predetermined length and then may pull on the second stem 108B until it reaches a predetermined length.
  • [0036]
    In at least one example, the first stem 108A and/or the second stem 108B may reach the predetermined length when the friction increasing elements and/or friction reducing elements cause the friction between the first stem 108A and/or the second stem 108B and a neighboring stem to reach a predetermined threshold. In other examples, the first stem 108A and/or the second stem 108B may reach the predetermined length when the tension elements cause the tension between the first stem 108A and/or the second stem 108B and a neighboring stem to reach a predetermined threshold. Holding elements and/or compression elements may also be used to limit a distance that the first stem 108A and/or second stem 108B is extendable from the second stem 108B and/or the third stem 108N, respectively.
  • [0037]
    The cosmetic apparatus 100 may further include one or more locking mechanisms for preventing retraction and/or extension. The locking mechanisms may include hook mechanisms, pin mechanisms, twist mechanisms, internal guides, friction increasing elements, friction reducing elements, tension elements, holding elements, compression elements, etc. In at least one example as shown in FIG. 1B, a hook or loop 116 may be coupled to the ferrule 104 or a first stem 108A. The hook or loop 116 may latch onto an extension 118 associated with the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N) to prevent the plurality of stems 108 from being extracted, as illustrated in FIG. 1B. In some examples, one of which is shown in FIG. 1C, a pin mechanism 120 may be activated such that pins may extend across one or more longitudinal cavities associated with the stems 108A, 108B, and/or 108N that prevent the stems 108A, 108B, and/or 108N from retracting. In other examples, ends of the stems 108A, 108B, and/or 108N may have threads that can interact with one another via a twisting mechanism of neighboring stems to lock neighboring stems and prevent the stems 108A, 108B, and/or 108N from extending and/or retracting.
  • [0038]
    FIG. 2A illustrates an isometric view of an example cosmetic apparatus 200 capable of extension and retraction configured in an extended position. FIG. 2A illustrates an example cosmetic apparatus 200 having an ovular cross sectional shape. As described above, the cosmetic apparatus 200 may have a variety of cross sectional shapes, including a circular cross sectional shape, rectangular cross sectional shape, triangular cross sectional shape, etc. Cosmetic apparatus 200 may be extended manually by pulling individual stems 108 along a longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus 200 or automatically by actuating an actuator, such as a push button, a knob, a twisting element, etc. A first stem 108A may be extracted to at least part of its full length from its nesting position inside of the longitudinal cavity of the second stem 108B. The second stem 108B may be extracted to at least part of its full length from its nesting position inside the longitudinal cavity of the third stem 108N. This process may be repeated until all of the stems 108 have been extracted from their nesting positions. The coupling mechanisms may ensure the stems do not extend beyond a predetermined length, as described above. The locking mechanisms may lock positions of the stems to ensure the stems do not retract during a time period of use, as described above.
  • [0039]
    FIG. 2B illustrates an isometric view of the example cosmetic apparatus 200 of FIG. 2A configured in a retracted position. Cosmetic apparatus 200 can be retracted manually or automatically using an actuator. As described above, the first stem 108A may be received by the second stem 108B. That is, the first stem 108A may be inserted into the longitudinal cavity of the second stem 108B. The second stem 108B, which may include the first stem 108A, may be received by the third stem 108N. That is, the second stem 108B may be inserted into the longitudinal cavity of the third stem 108N. This process may be repeated until all of the stems 108 have been inserted into the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N). Limiting mechanisms may be used to limit a distance that a stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be inserted into a neighboring stem, as described above.
  • [0040]
    FIG. 3A is an isometric view of another example cosmetic apparatus 300 capable of extension and retraction. The cosmetic apparatus 300 may have two applicator heads for applying multiple products with a single apparatus having a telescopic handle 106. In some examples, a first applicator head 102A and a second applicator head 102B may be coupled to opposite ends of the handle 106. In other examples, a first applicator head 102A may be associated with a first ferrule 104A that may be associated with a first end of the handle 106 and a second applicator head 102A may be associated with a first end of a second ferrule 104B. A second end of the second ferrule 104B that is opposite the first end of the second ferrule 104B may be associated with a second end of the handle 106 that is opposite the first end of the handle 106. The first applicator head 102A and the second applicator head 102B may be of a same type of applicator head or a different type of applicator head. For instance, the first applicator head 102A may be a brush applicator head and the second applicator head 102B may be a sponge applicator head.
  • [0041]
    In some examples, the plurality of stems 108 may extend in a same direction along a longitudinal axis. That is, a first applicator head 102A may be associated with the first ferrule 104A, which may be associated with a first stem 108A, as described above. The first stem 108A may be movably fitted into the longitudinal cavity of the second stem 108A and the second stem may be movably fitted into the longitudinal cavity of the third stem 108N. The first end of the second ferrule 104B may be associated with an end of the third stem 108N that is opposite the second stem 108B and the second end of the second ferrule 104B may be associated with the second applicator head 102B. That is, in some examples, a second applicator head 102B can be coupled to the end of the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N, in this example). In some examples, the second applicator head 102B that can be coupled to the end of the anchor stem (e.g., third stem 108N, in this example) can be coupled directly to the handle 106, without being coupled to a ferrule 104. In such examples, the cosmetic apparatus 300 having applicator heads 102A and 102B disposed on opposite ends of the handle 106 may have one applicator head 102A disposed on a first end of the handle 106 that may be slidable using a telescopic mechanism (e.g., the first stem 108 and second stem 108B in this example) and the other applicator head 102A disposed on a second end of the handle 106 that is stationary (e.g., the third stem 108N in this example).
  • [0042]
    In other examples, such as the example illustrated in FIG. 3A, the plurality of stems 108A, 108B, 108N, 108C, 108D may extend in opposite directions along a longitudinal axis. For example, stems 108A and 108B may extend in a first direction and stems 108C and 108D may extend in an opposite direction along the longitudinal axis. In such examples, stems 108A and 108B may be configured as described above with the second stem 108B being movably fitted into the longitudinal cavity of the third stem 108N on a first end of the third stem 108N in an extended position. Stems 108C and 108D may be configured similarly to stems 108A and 108B with stem 108C being movably fitted into the longitudinal cavity of the third stem 108N on second end of the third stem 108N, the second end of the third stem 108N being opposite the first end of the third stem 108N in an extended position. Accordingly, some of the plurality of stems (e.g., stems 108A, 108B) may move in direction along the longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus 300 opposite other of the plurality of stems (e.g., stems 108C, 108D). In such examples, the anchor stem (e.g., stem 108N) may have a length sufficient to receive at least a portion of the stems (e.g., 108B and 108C) movably fitted in both of its ends.
  • [0043]
    In some examples, a user can pull on both ends of the cosmetic apparatus to cause the applicator heads 102A and 102B to extend in their respective directions and, when the amount of force exceeds a predetermined threshold, the handle 106 can be configured to disassociate to form two separate cosmetic apparatuses 300A and 300B, as shown in FIG. 3B. The two separate cosmetic apparatuses 300A and 300B may be removably coupled such that after the two cosmetic apparatuses 300A and 300B are separated, they may be re-coupled by inserting the end of the handle opposite the applicator head 102B into the end of the handle opposite the applicator head 102A. The two separate cosmetic apparatuses 300A and 300B may be coupled by coupling mechanisms and/or locking mechanisms as described above.
  • Methods Using a Telescopic Cosmetic Brush
  • [0044]
    In some examples, a user can extend and retract the cosmetic apparatus (e.g., cosmetic apparatus 100, 200, and/or 300) manually. As described above, a user may desire to use a cosmetic apparatus that has a long handle 106, such as the cosmetic apparatuses illustrated in FIGS. 1A and 2A. Accordingly, a user may pull on the first stem 108A to extract the first stem 108A from the longitudinal cavity in the second stem 108B. The user may pull the first stem 108A until it reaches a predetermined length as determined by the coupling mechanisms described above. The user may pull the second stem 108B out of the longitudinal cavity in the third stem 108N until it reaches a predetermined length as determined by the coupling mechanisms, as described above. The user may pull from the applicator head 102 and/or ends of the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N. In some examples, a user may lock the first stem 108A and/or the second stem 108B via locking mechanisms to prevent the handle from retracting while the user uses the cosmetic apparatus configured in the extended position.
  • [0045]
    A user may desire to use a cosmetic apparatus that has a short handle 106, such as the cosmetic apparatuses illustrated in FIGS. 1B and 2B. Accordingly, a user may push the first stem 108A into the longitudinal cavity in the second stem 108B. The user may push the first stem 108A until it reaches a predetermined distance as determined by the limiting mechanisms 112 described above. The user may continue to apply force to the first stem 108A to effectively apply force to the second stem 108B to insert the second stem 108B into the longitudinal cavity in the third stem 108N. Again, the user may push the second stem 108B until it reaches a predetermined distance as determined by the limiting mechanisms 112, as described above. In some examples, a user may lock the first stem 108A and/or the second stem 108B via locking mechanisms to prevent the handle 106 from extending while the user uses and/or stores the retracted cosmetic apparatus.
  • [0046]
    Alternatively, the cosmetic apparatus can be extended or retracted automatically. In some examples, the user can slide the plurality of stems 108 along the longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus by actuating an actuator such as a push button disposed on one or more of the stems 108, a knob disposed on one or more of the stems 108, a twisting element disposed on one or more of the stems 108, a rotatable portion disposed on one or more of the stems 108, a squeezable portion disposed on one or more of the stems 108, or a switch mechanism disposed on one or more of the stems 108. The actuator 402 may be connected to a mechanical linkage housed in the longitudinal cavities associated with each of the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N. In some examples, the actuator may be connected to the applicator head 102 via a hydraulic mechanism, an electrical mechanism, a pneumatic mechanism, a magnetic mechanism, or the like. The actuator may be connected to the applicator head 102 such that the applicator head 102 can extend and/or retract along the longitudinal axis of the cosmetic apparatus 400 when the actuator is actuated.
  • [0047]
    In at least one example, the plurality of stems 108 can be extended and/or retracted using a mechanism similar to a spring loaded mechanism used with retractable knives or lipstick applicators, for example. FIGS. 4A and 4B illustrate a cross-sectional view of an example cosmetic apparatus 400 taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A in a retracted position and an extended position. The cosmetic apparatus may be arranged in a retracted position and the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may include locking mechanisms 402 between adjacent stems 108 to keep the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N locked in the retracted position, as illustrated in FIG. 4A. The locking mechanisms 402 may include holding elements (e.g., detents, magnets, etc.), twist elements, etc. In some examples where the locking mechanisms 402 include detents, the detents may be hard detents that can be released by pushing down on a portion of the detent that may protrude from a surface of the stems 108. In other examples where the locking mechanisms 402 include detents, the detents may be soft detents that can be released by firmly applying force to the stems 108 that are locked by the soft detent.
  • [0048]
    The applicator head 102 and the third stem 108N may be coupled to a spring 404 that may be leveraged to extend the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N along the longitudinal axis. An actuator may be coupled to the spring mechanism. When a user actuates the actuator, tension in the spring 404 may increase. When the tension exceeds a predetermined threshold, the spring 404 may decompress and propel the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N along the longitudinal axis until the spring 404 and/or the stems 108 are fully extended, as illustrated in FIG. 4B. One or more locking mechanisms 402, as described above may be used to prevent the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N from retracting while in the extended position.
  • [0049]
    When the user desires to retract the cosmetic apparatus 400, the user may push the deactivate the actuator and the spring 404 may compress, causing the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N to recede into the longitudinal cavity of the neighboring stems and/or anchor stem, as illustrated in FIG. 4A. The user may manually retract the stems 108 by pushing the stems 108 together and compressing the spring 404. Once the spring is compressed, the locking mechanisms 402 may be used to lock the cosmetic apparatus 400 in the retracted position.
  • [0050]
    In additional examples, the cosmetic apparatus may be twistable to extend and/or retract the cosmetic apparatus similar to twistable mechanisms used for lipstick applicators or retractable ball point pens. FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate a cross-sectional view of an example cosmetic apparatus 500 taken along line A-A of FIG. 1A in a retracted position and an extended position. For example, at least part of a longitudinal cavity of a stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may include a thread 502 for interacting with a complimentary thread disposed on an exterior portion of a neighboring corresponding stem 108A, 108B, . . . 108N. The user may twist one or more stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N in a first direction along the longitudinal axis to an extended position, as illustrated in FIG. 5A. One or more limiting mechanisms (e.g., friction increasing elements, friction reducing elements, tension elements, holding elements, compression elements, etc.) may be used to limit a distance the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N may be extended in the linear direction. A locking mechanism, as described above, may be used to lock the cosmetic apparatus in the extended position. To retract the individual stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N, the locking mechanism may be deactivated and the user may twist the stems 108A, 108B, . . . 108N in a second, opposite direction along the longitudinal axis until the stems 108 return to the retracted position, as illustrated in FIG. 5B.
  • CONCLUSION
  • [0051]
    Although several embodiments have been described in language specific to structural features and/or methodological acts, it is to be understood that the claims are not necessarily limited to the specific features or acts described. Rather, the specific features and acts are disclosed as illustrative forms of implementing the claimed subject matter.
Patentzitate
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Referenziert von
Zitiert von PatentEingetragen Veröffentlichungsdatum Antragsteller Titel
USD787835 *18. März 201530. Mai 2017HCT Group Holdings LimitedMulti-head dual end cosmetic applicator
Klassifizierungen
Internationale KlassifikationA45D33/36, A45D34/04, A45D40/26
UnternehmensklassifikationA45D2200/10, A45D40/262, A45D34/042, A45D33/36
Juristische Ereignisse
DatumCodeEreignisBeschreibung
24. Okt. 2014ASAssignment
Owner name: HCT GROUP HOLDINGS LIMITED, CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LIM, CINDY SEAN YUEI;REEL/FRAME:034027/0190
Effective date: 20141023